Watson Believes Pre-Engineering Can Help Him Impact the World

Cody Watson, a Tuttle High School junior, enrolled in Pre-Engineering in hopes of best preparing for a college education at three prestigious universities nationwide. He attracted the attention of professors at Yale University last summer by winning an engineering design challenge. Watson is pictured with a 3D printer in the Pre-Engineering classroom at CV Tech’s Cowan Campus in Yukon.

February 23, 2017

YUKON – Cody Watson peers at the sky and sees possibilities. Not limits.

Watson envisions a future with NASA. Or Spacex. If neither pans out, he could always apply to work with Formula 1 racing or The Boeing Company.

Watson, 16, and a Tuttle High School junior, wants to impact the world.

The next step for him was enrolling this year in Canadian Valley Technology Center’s Pre-Engineering program.

This was on the heels of a nine-day summer trip to the National Student Leadership Conference at Yale University in New Haven, Conn., last July.

He knew engineering was a possibility for the future, especially after winning a real-world engineering challenge at the leadership conference. Watson modified a portable breathing apparatus for COPD sufferers. His design was chosen as best overall among more than 200 entries.

More recently, Watson appeared on KOKH-25 news to accept the Noble Cause Award, which included a certificate and $100 check. The program, sponsored by the McIntyre Law Firm, recognizes young people for outstanding community service projects.

The award was in recognition of another effort.

“I applied for (Operation Homefront’s) Military Child of the Year,” Watson said.

His father, Michael, has been in the Coast Guard for the past 26 years.

This award recognizes military children who are recognized as exceptional citizens while facing the challenges of military family life.

Winners receive $10,000, a laptop and a trip to Washington, D.C., for the awards gala alongside senior leaders of each branch of the military.

The average Military Child of the Year nominee has moved five times or more; experienced at least one parent deploy for 18 months or more; and volunteered with service groups an average of 75 hours during a year.

They must also maintain above-average grades, have excelled in sports, theatre or music and held leadership positions in school and community groups.

Watson has been notified that he is among the top five for the Coast Guard branch award.

His school activities include student council junior representative at Tuttle and CV Tech student ambassador. He’s also learned that he will be named the statewide president of the National Honor Society of Oklahoma.

Pre-Engineering, he said, offers an opportunity to further his learning.

After high school, Watson is intent on pursuing an engineering degree in aerospace and mechanical engineering. He has options, and again, he’s not limiting himself to just one.

His top three college choices as of now are Yale, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescott, Ariz., and the University of Washington.

Watson said his parents encouraged him to take the best path to his dreams. He believes Pre-Engineering is helping him do just that.

“I had a few options, but my parents and I concluded that the technology center is the best fit for me,” he said.

“It has allowed me to get first-hand experience in designing, creating, troubleshooting and problem solving. And it teaches you to develop really good study habits.”